What is pet aquamation?

Original Question: What is aquamation? - Anonymous

What is pet aquamation? Aug 8, 2020

Another alternative to cremation is aquamation also known as alkaline hydrolysis, water reduction or bio-cremation. It is the reduction of the body by a chemical process instead of a flame process. Water is heated to about 300 degrees Fahrenheit with a chemical called sodium hydroxide. The body is placed into the aquamation chamber that is sealed and the solution is added. Under pressure, the water is heated and the process begins to work on the soft tissues of the body. What remains after this process are bone fragments, which are dried and then further pulverized leaving the ash as a light sage or white color due to the retention of minerals and lack of carbon discoloration. Because the bone and ash need to go through a drying time, a day or two is needed before ashes can be returned to families (if desired). Just like with a typical cremation, ashes are poured into a sealed plastic bag, cardboard box, or tin and safely returned to the family.

Dr. Jocelyn Anne Mason, DVM

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What is pet aquamation?
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What is pet aquamation?
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Aquamation also known as alkaline hydrolysis, water reduction or bio-cremation is the reduction of the body by a chemical process instead of a flame process.
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Healthcare for Pets
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