Do you recommend a stool test for my dog who is on a raw food diet?

Original Question: Do you recommend a stool test for my dog who is on a raw food diet? - Anonymous

Do you recommend a stool test for my dog who is on a raw food diet? Nov 25, 2020

You should consider a stool test because raw dog food (like under cooked meat or unwashed vegetables) can be contaminated with some pretty scary bacteria. The most concerning are Salmonella and Campylobacter. In dogs these bacteria can cause mild to severe digestive upset, most commonly loose or watery diarrhea, with or without vomiting, fever, abdominal pain, decreased energy level, and loss of appetite. These bacteria can be life-threatening in puppies or in adults with suppressed immune systems. Fortunately for dogs, most of them infected with Salmonella or Campylobacter will stay healthy. However, they can still shed them in the stool intermittently, serving as a source of contamination for other dogs and people. 

These bacteria are a serious health concern for people who can get illness symptoms similar to their dogs. Young children, the elderly, and people with weakened immune systems are at higher risk for more severe infections. Stool tests should be performed twice yearly on an adult dog. Unlike the basic stool test typically done by veterinarians, stool testing for raw fed pets should include screening for Salmonella and Campylobacter

Dennis Chmiel, DVM, MBA

Loading component ...
Summary
Do you recommend a stool test for my dog who is on a raw food diet?
Article Name
Do you recommend a stool test for my dog who is on a raw food diet?
Description
You should consider a stool test because raw dog food (like under cooked meat or unwashed vegetables) can be contaminated with some pretty scary bacteria.
Author
Publisher Name
Healthcare for Pets
Publisher Logo

Disclaimer: healthcareforpets.com and its team of veterinarians and clinicians do not endorse any products, services, or recommended advice. All advice presented by our veterinarians, clinicians, tools, resources, etc is not meant to replace a regular physical exam and consultation with your primary veterinarian or other clinicians. We always encourage you to seek medical advice from your regular veterinarian.

Related Q&A

  • Do small or large breed dogs have more problems with their teeth?
  • Answered by: Jeanne Perrone, MS, CVT, VTS (Dentistry)
  • Sep 5, 2020
  • How do dogs contract leptospirosis and how can it be prevented?
  • Answered by: Dr. Alex Avery, BVSc
  • Jun 21, 2019
  • What is the best diet to feed a dog?
  • Answered by: Dr. Alex Avery, BVSc
  • Jun 21, 2019
  • My dog constantly needs their anal glands expressed. What is the cause and treatment?
  • Answered by: Dr. Alex Avery, BVSc
  • Jun 21, 2019